Posts Tagged ‘social media’

Criminal Records – 28th October 2022

Christopher Nosnibor

Having released the No Guts All the Glory EP in November last year, just seven months after their second LP, False Company, Weekend Recovery have already been making announcements about album number three, to be named Esoteric. We’ll have to wait and see if it lives up to its titles promise of obscure knowledge and rare wisdom, but lead single ‘Chemtrails’ has already garnered some advance radio play and some kudos from DJs in the process.

First, it’s a snappy tune with a nagging guitar and an airy vocal hook and a load of their now trademark woo-oohs, so it’s radio-friendly, but more than that, this song packs a lot onto two minutes and eighteen seconds. Stylistically, it’s a poppy punky hybrid that’s equal parts X-Ray Spex and Shampoo. Then there’s the fact that Lori shifts into a spoken delivery for the verses: it’s not rappy, but it’s rhythmic, and puts the lyrics to the fore.

Lyrically, it’s interesting, in that it’s wide-ranging in its coverage. Now, it’s hard to pinpoint precisely when the ‘chemtrails’ debate began to really get traction, or why, other than ‘The Internet’ regarding the latter, but it starts out with the protagonist articulating mental confusion with the endless barrage of fake news and waves sending her insane, ‘chemtrails’ in her head and the endless talking, before swinging round to take what for some may seem an unexpected swipe at one of the particular strains of feminism that’s become popular among female-fronted circuit peers as she says ‘See, what you wanna do is stop being so right on / Telling girls to come forward, and stand where they belong / You jump into the crowd and shout and dance around.’ It shouldn’t be in any way divisive to point out that inverting the behaviours of patriarchal society by means of ‘positive discrimination’ is not the route to equality, but it’ll be interesting to see how this pans out, but it there needs to be the kind of discussion Weekend Recovery seem to be inviting here.

Sonically, it’s got more separation, and is less ‘wall of fuzz’ than the last album and EP, which is perhaps another factor in its radio appeal, although the drums are pretty dense and thick, a far cry from the trebly crack of the snares on so many commercial pop songs.

It’s a strong offering that has more depth than is first apparent – and that’s entirely the point: ‘Chemtrails’ is a song about questioning conformity. Because pop doesn’t have to be bland or vacant.

Weekend Recovery - Chemtrails (3000px)

Weekend Recovery by Jess Johnson

Photo by Jess Johnson

Electro-pop artist EVA X has just unveiled the new video for her single, "Machine."  The video was directed, shot and edited by Erik Gustafson (GRENDEL / ADORATION DESTROYED).

About the song: "Machine" is the first look at EVA X’s upcoming album, I Dream Of A Reality. EVA X has the following to say about the song and its story: "I have a complicated relationship with my body. I do love it, but sometimes I wish it was different. I wrote "Machine" in a vulnerable spot, when I’d have given anything to feel beautiful like other women on social media. Chasing that aesthetic with injections and makeup was powerful, but also scary – I could create the face and body I wanted, but what would happen when it wore off? I took all of these tangled feelings and poured them into "Machine". When I brought the demo to my co-producers, Shane and Adam immediately jumped on it, bringing it to life with a frenetic energy that captured perfectly how alluring and isolating that illusion can be. In the music video, I wanted to explore what being beautiful in the alternative community looks and feels like, and how far we go for aesthetics. I taught myself choreography to capture the movement I wanted. Erik and I designed a video that captured both the sexiness I wanted and the reality of cutting and injecting ourselves for it."

Watch the video here:

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23rd April 2021

Christopher Nosnibor

They may be in the midst of a lineup change and lacking a guitarist and drummer, but while live activity isn’t an option, London-based Emergency are still in aa position to raise their profile with the release of single ‘Another Hit’, a swipe at social media and its content creators, while also turning the lens inwards and reflecting on the role of the consumer and the element of hypocrisy that’s inherent within that.

It’s relatable, to the extent that most of us do it, and I’ll confess my guilt also: I’ve spent what feel like an eternity bitching about Instagram being the platform for vain hipsters before finally relenting and setting up and account ostensibly because, y’know, maximum exposure and all, but I feel like a sell-out and a hypocrite, but it’s just the way of the world, right? Like being absolutely sick to death of everyone’s pictures of their pets and their meals, so electing to do the same, only ‘ironically’ – right? Fuck it. Postmodernism is dead, irony is dead. Thankfully, killer tunes played with energy never die, and ‘Another Hit’ is tight, punchy, zesty, and a shade acerbic, packing some sharp critique and packaged into some astute guitar-driven post-punk influenced indie, with a dash of surf rock and a hint of Franz Ferdinand in the mix.

It’s choppy, dynamic, and has one of those buzzing riffs that drills into your head on the very first listen. Absolute killer.

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Emergency - Artwork