Posts Tagged ‘Heavy’

Centuries have premiered a video from their second LP, The Lights Of This Earth Are Blinding out now through Southern Lord. Set to the album track ‘May Love Be With You Always’, the video was filmed and edited by Derrick Flanagin, and uses footage from Germany, Italy, Austria, India, Thailand, Vietnam, and Japan.

In the band’s words, "the video is about human movement and the constant inertia we experience, frequently without taking time to properly reflect on it. Things we see, people we meet, places we go, stories we are told; events that are so fleeting they often don’t become catalogued in our memory and will forever exist only in that moment."

Watch the video below – tour dates in full after.

AA

CENTURIES EUROPEAN TOUR WITH PORTRAYAL OF GUILT:

28/04/18 GER Greifswald Klex

29/04/18 SWE Gothenburg Sekten

30/04/18 SWE Stockholm Firestorm Fest

01/05/18 SWE Malmö

02/05/18 DK Copenhagen

03/05/18 GER Hamburg

04/05/18 NL Amsterdam/Utrecht Fest

05/05/18 GER Cologne Privat

06/05/18 BE Antwerp Kavka

07/05/18 FR Paris La Comedia Michelet

08/05/18 CH / FR

09/05/18 GER Stuttgart Juha West

10/05/18 GER Bielefeld/GER Weimar

11/05/18 GER Berlin Miss the Stars Fest

+ + +

12/05/18 CZ Prague **

13/05/18 AT Vienna Venster 99 **

14/05/18 HRO Zagreb AKC Attack **

15/05/18 IT Bolzano Bunker Youth Center TBA **

16/05/18 AT Innsbruck DeCentral **

17/05/18 GER Regensburg Alte Mälzerei **

18/05/18 GER Darmstadt Oettinger Villa **

19/05/18 GER Leipzig/Halle **

**Dates without Centuries. Portrayal Of Guilt only

Candlelight Records – 23rd February 2018

Christopher Nosnibor

Having caught Black Moth live early on, before the release of their debut, I’m in a position to attest just how far they’ve come and how much they’ve grown. And third album, Anatomical Venus shows their trajectory continues upwards and outwards: with each release, they’re bigger, and simply more.

If debut The Killing Jar was a rock-solid heavy rock album that revelled in the vintage riffery of Sabbath and its successor, Condemned to Hope was the sound of a band coming into their own and filing out their songs with heavier, denser chuggage, Anatomical Venues combines the strongest elements of its predecessors and brings an even harder, heavier edge, while at the same time bristling with even sharper hooks and stronger vocal melodies.

‘Buried Hoards’ blends grunge and goth to forge a dark grandeur, while the six-and-a-half-minute ‘Severed Grace’ finds Harriet bring a certain sneer and tantalisingly teasing edge to her delivery, which weaves its way around a serpentine lead guitar and super-dense bass throb. And across the album, Back Moth bring groove galore. Anatomical Venus leans toward the quicker tempo: ‘A Lovers Hate’ is less Sabbath and more Motörhead, a punk attitude informing the driving guitar-based assault. Compositionally, it’s stripped-back and simple, something that’s been core to Black Moth’s work from the outset: namely, that the riff is king. Front and centre, the riff. Simple, but effective, four chord workouts lie at the heart of most of the songs. In the world of both rock and pop, less is invariably more. Back Moth know this and exploit it well.

There’s no substitute for a beefy bit of guitar you can get your head down to. Not that they lack technical prowess: the solos are killer, but never overlong or excessively flamboyant. There’s simply no fat to be found on Anatomical Venus.

The album’s last track, ‘Pig Man’, lands somewhere between Lydia Lunch and Melvins, with a churning sludge metal riff and a sassy, semi-spoken verse… and noise. Cathartic, chaotic noise building to a climactic crescendo.

Black Moth’s strength has always been their knack for solid, hard rock that fundamentally plays to the rules – by which I mean, their focus has been quality over innovation. This is actually an admirable quality, because they’re a band who grasp what makes rock music rock. But Anatomical Venus sees the band extend their horizons, without losing sight of any of the qualities that made them in the first place. And in bringing everything all together, and making it tighter, tauter, and as dense and heavy as ever, Black Moth have delivered their strongest, most focused album to date.

AAA

Black Moth - Anatomical Venus

Ripple Music – 19th January 2018

James Wells

Maybe it’s just me – and it’s quite possible – but many of the current crop of so-called doom-metal bands are pretty tame, and are little more than Sabbath-inspired hard rock bands lacking in inspiration and keen to jump on the metal zeitgeist of circa 2015.

I’m not intentionally singling out female-fronted doom acts, but I was recently appalled by Jess and the Ancient Ones for reasons which really ought to be apparent, and those reasons aren’t a million miles away from the anguish on being presented with Witchcryer’s latest offering.

Cry Witch is better, less cliché and less Jeffersone Airplane meets The Doors, which is a relief. A major fucking relief. But it’s still so steeped in cliché and heritage as so be not so much so last year and so ersatz retro bullshit and to be deeply uncomfortable. And it’s not especially doomy.

There are some ok riffs and the thumping bass embarks on some neat little runs, and the title track, which is also the opener makes for a strong enough start, and sonically, stylistically, it’s representative of the album as a whole. So what’s the problem? Actually, that’s precisely the problem. Against, say, Black Moth, who are also of a similar ilk Witchcryer sound tame, and while there’s not much different in the two band’s approaches, the lack of real bite could be forgiven if the hooks were sharper. But the preoccupation with mining the vintage seam has apparently eclipsed any quest to forge their own identity.

AAA

Witchcryer – Cry Witch

Prepare your mind, body, and the deepest recesses of your soul: the black gates that Dark Buddha Rising opened a decade ago with I, open further in 2018, as the band announce the II EP, due for release via Neurot Recordings on 23rd March 2018. II continues to traverse spiritual planes, opening up a vortex with their sonic, and following calls from beyond.

For 10 years, the Finnish band has convened in the now-famous Wastement studio space; set below their home city of Tampere, Finland; to roil in the sounds of the underground, to meet dark spirits, to breathe in time with rhythmic pulses sent from the skies, the stars and the very dirt around them.

On the surface, the band emits the blackest of psychedelia. Deep down, their sounds are forged in the blue fires of the ancients, exhalations of gods, goddesses and demons alike. Of this new offering, V. Ajomo says: "To drain our sonic temple, we wanted to record the new material which was made for 2016 shows in order to proceed towards the unknown with open minds and hearts. After the cleansing, we initiated our chamber with ambient meditation and opened the portals of inspiration for our future work."

II sees Dark Buddha Rising return to its purest incarnation: a three-piece rhythm section; J.Rämänen on drums, P. Rämänen on bass and V. Ajomo on guitar; and with J. Saarivuori on synths and M. Neuman on main vocals. "We have done a full cycle of the orbit and now is the time for gravitational slingshot towards the new dimensions in sound, deliverance and vision"; Ajomo adds.

The EP’s A-side was recorded and mixed in Space Junk Studio by K.Nyyssönen and B-side was recorded in Wastement by DBR and mixed by S. Tamminen.

It has been two years since Dark Buddha Rising found a home amongst kindred spirits at Neurot Recordings, who released Inversum; the first album recorded in the band’s Wastement home: "the asylum of eternal feedback".

Get a taste of II here: