Posts Tagged ‘Grave Lines’

London/Brighton heavy contingent Grave Lines who released latest album ‘Fed Into The Nihilist Engine’ in the first half of 2018 have announced UK tour dates for February 2019 with Dystopian Future Movies. Vocalist Jake Harding comments,


‘We always enjoy working with bands that fit in with our ethos and aesthetic without necessarily having the same kind of sound and Dystopian Future Movies intense atmosphere is a perfect fit for that so we couldnt resist teaming up with them for a short run of dates.  To make it a bit special we are also collaborating on some music with them which will be available on the tour in a limited number of copies. We’ll be bringing the gloom two fold in February!"

Released via London label New Heavy Sounds, ‘Fed Into The Nihilist Engine’  is a must listen for fans of all things heavy, however anybody seeking music that delves into the darker and more introspective aspects of the human condition, will find much to love within its expansive tracks. At times quiet and melancholy. At times an oppressive and miserable onslaught of crushing riffs and filth-laden grooves. Fans of Yob to Neurosis, even Bauhaus or Dead Can Dance, take heed, FITNE reaches out to encompass elements of them all.


UK tour dates w/ Dystopian Future Movies:

Thursday 7th February, Record Junkee, Sheffield

holyspiderpromotions.bigcartel.com

Friday 8th February,  Wharf Chambers, Leeds

www.wegottickets.com/event/456847

Saturday 9th February, Black Heart, Camden, London

www.seetickets.com/event/grave-lines-dystopian-future-movies/the-black-heart/1293168

Sunday 10th February, Chameleon Arts Cafe, Nottingham

dystopianfuturemovies.com/shows

Watch the video for ‘The Nihilist Engine’ directed by Noomi Spook:

AA

Grave Lines Promo 5

Advertisements

New Heavy Sounds – 4th May 2018

Christopher Nosnibor

Grave Lines’ second album is… heavy.

From a personal perspective, they impressed me no end when I caught them supporting Black Moth when their tour for Anatomical Venus landed in their hometown of Leeds. Mostly, because their set was brutal in its weight, the howling vocals sitting in the mid-range and low in the mix against a tempest of low-end guitar noise.

Fed Into the Nihlist Engine doesn’t disappoint, and captures the essence of the live sound. It also opens in the most daring fashion, with a fifteen-minute epic that blends ferocity and dirginess to form a perfect balance: at first coming on like Amenra in their haunting, atmospheric passages, before erupting into a full-blown assault of rage. Its crawling pace and sinewy lead guitar parts, paired with dense, chugging rhythm with major emphasis on the bottom end make for a punishing experience. However, over the course of the album’s nine tracks, Grave Lines demonstrate a remarkable range and a deep-seated sense of atmosphere and texture. It’s heavy – seriously heavy, in fact – but it’s also light: ‘Shame Retreat’ is a delicate acoustic song, simple and completive, and elsewhere, there are some beautifully melodic passages.

In fact, much of the weight of Fed Into the Nihilist Engine isn’t about crushing guitars, overdriven and overloaded and labouring amp-blowing riffs – not that there isn’t an abundance of these. No, Grave Lines explore the brooding a the shadowy, the quietly intense, the darkness of the gothic. ‘Self Mutilation by Fire and Stone’ sees Harding adopt an almost crooning goth baritone in places. ‘Loss Betrayal’ – at least for the first minute or so – sounds more like early iLiKETRAiNS with its chiming post-rock guitar and reflective stance. And then it all piles in, while on ‘Silent Salt’, the guitars grind and churn relentlessly from the start. ‘Loathe Displace’ is similarly disarming, stripped back, a wheezing, undulating organ drone providing the instrumental backdrop to Jake Harding’s surprisingly sensitive and tuneful vocals.

But when they do hit the overdrive pedals, they really go in hard and heavy. The one thing they don’t do is uptempo. These are slow, deliberate slabs of sound that bludgeon the senses. This is the sound of anger. This is punishment. There’s a lot of grind and churn going down on Fed Into the Nihilist Engine: ‘The Greae’ has that early Melvins vibe about it, only shoutier, and it grinds on well past the seven-minute mark.

Fed Into the Nihilist Engine really works the contrasts and dynamics, but not in the way, say, Neurosis do – which I suppose is my way of saying not in a way that’s formulaic or predictable.

Ultimately, Fed Into the Nihilist Engine is a dark album. And yet, it’s a dark album that’s haunting, moving and achingly beautiful in its articulation of despondency and disquiet.

AA

Grave Lines - Nihilist Engine