Posts Tagged ‘Southern Lord’

Salt Lake City-based duo Eagle Twin share ‘The Heavy Hoof’ from their incoming and third album, The Thundering Heard (Songs Of Hoof And Horn), due out on March 30th via Southern Lord.

About the track Gentry Densley comments,”The Heavy Hoof is the first Eagle Twin song we ever wrote so it has been something we have played throughout the years but never properly recorded until now. Its a simple ditty, that has only gotten heavier over time, all about death and the devil and all that good stuff!  Its also about, you know, leaving your particles tingling, dancing in space, after your consciousness has been trampled."

‘The Heavy Hoof’ is heavy alright: get your lugs round it here:

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Eagle Twin - Thundering

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Centuries have premiered a video from their second LP, The Lights Of This Earth Are Blinding out now through Southern Lord. Set to the album track ‘May Love Be With You Always’, the video was filmed and edited by Derrick Flanagin, and uses footage from Germany, Italy, Austria, India, Thailand, Vietnam, and Japan.

In the band’s words, "the video is about human movement and the constant inertia we experience, frequently without taking time to properly reflect on it. Things we see, people we meet, places we go, stories we are told; events that are so fleeting they often don’t become catalogued in our memory and will forever exist only in that moment."

Watch the video below – tour dates in full after.

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CENTURIES EUROPEAN TOUR WITH PORTRAYAL OF GUILT:

28/04/18 GER Greifswald Klex

29/04/18 SWE Gothenburg Sekten

30/04/18 SWE Stockholm Firestorm Fest

01/05/18 SWE Malmö

02/05/18 DK Copenhagen

03/05/18 GER Hamburg

04/05/18 NL Amsterdam/Utrecht Fest

05/05/18 GER Cologne Privat

06/05/18 BE Antwerp Kavka

07/05/18 FR Paris La Comedia Michelet

08/05/18 CH / FR

09/05/18 GER Stuttgart Juha West

10/05/18 GER Bielefeld/GER Weimar

11/05/18 GER Berlin Miss the Stars Fest

+ + +

12/05/18 CZ Prague **

13/05/18 AT Vienna Venster 99 **

14/05/18 HRO Zagreb AKC Attack **

15/05/18 IT Bolzano Bunker Youth Center TBA **

16/05/18 AT Innsbruck DeCentral **

17/05/18 GER Regensburg Alte Mälzerei **

18/05/18 GER Darmstadt Oettinger Villa **

19/05/18 GER Leipzig/Halle **

**Dates without Centuries. Portrayal Of Guilt only

Southern Lord – 24th November 2017

James Wells

When you’re presented with an album containing ten tracks, where only two clock in at over two minutes, you know it’s likely to be a pretty direct attack, and you don’t need a lengthy dissection to get the guts. In fact, you don’t need words, you just need to feel it kicking you in the guts, over and over.

No Cure For Death is a gnarly, guttural, snarling mess of feedback and noise. Savage, brutal, unrestrained noise: that’s what No Cure For Death throws down from beginning to end – not that it’s a particularly long period between the two markers.

Death, decay, despair ooze from every pore of this feedback-soaked frenzy of blistering noise. It’s dark, dingy, a seething miasma of gut-churning overloading, overdriven loathing of all things. It’s the world we live in, of course: it’s fucked-up and ruined. It’s everything it should be.

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Sect cover image for Haulix

With the album No Cure For Death incoming via Southern Lord next month, the label have unveiled the opening track from the second album by SECT. With ‘Open Grave’, the North American straightedge/vegan hardcore/crust group go all-out on the gnarly nastiness.

Southern Lord will release No Cure For Death on CD, LP, and digital formats on November 24th.

Get your lugs round all 1:20 of the brutality that is ‘Open Grave’ here:

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SECT

Virginia/North Carolina-based instrumental metal ministers Loincloth have shared an official video for ‘Bestial Infernal’, hailing from their final LP Psalm Of The Morbid Whore, which was issued last week through Southern Lord.

We’ll skip the preamble and get down to gnarly business. Here’s the video:

Southern Lord – 29th September 2017

Christopher Nosnibor

It’s been five years since Wreck appeared on Alternative Tentacles. So what have Unsane been doing in the intervening period? Gazing at their navels, taking up yoga and discovering a serene spirituality as a means of dealing with the anguish of life in the modern world? As if. They’ve been distilling their brutal rage into even more intensely bleak slabs of sonic nihilism. And, naturally, it’s housed in appropriately unsubtle, gore-soaked artwork. Unsane’s album covers are nothing if not distinct: while so many metal album covers which display hematomaniac tendencies are highly stylised and revel in the intended shock value, Unsane’s covers are all the more shocking by view of their clinicality, resembling crime scene photos than works of art. This is in many ways true of the music itself: there’s a functionality, a bluntness about it, and no sense of there being any indulgence or show.

Everything about Sterilize is stark, uncompromising, and connotes post-industrial, post-everything society, the dehumanising effects of merely trying to exist in the capitalist world where everyone gets pushed further and further down for the benefit of the few. It’s the soundtrack to life being sucked from the soul, the sonic encapsulation of desolate fury.

The grey steel assault of ‘Factory’ sets the tone and tempo: screeching feedback whistles through the grey, grain of the guitars and sludgy bass. From thereon in, the ferocious howls of anguish and packed in tight, back-to-back.

The song titles are also functional, direct, descriptive. Again, there’s no fluff, and little joy, to be found around ‘We’re Fucked’, ‘A Slow Reaction’ or ‘Distance’. Everything is paired back to the bare essentials and compacted for maximum impact. This includes the blues-based sound that defines Unsane: it’s crunched up, compressed, stomped into submission, meaning that while there is a certain swing to it, it’s limited to the most concise and precise form.

‘The Grind’ is aptly titled and brings a thunderous deluge of guitar; ‘Aberration’ is built around a simple four-chord trudge; and ‘No Reprieve’ sums up the album as a whole. You don’t listen to Unsane for variety, either across a given album, or their output overall. You listen to Unsane to vent, to experience a relentless viscerality. There’s something almost self-flagellatory about listening to an Unsane album in its entirety. At a certain point, the initial sense of catharsis is replaced by a crushing claustrophobia. This isn’t to say it’s an unpleasant experience, but is indicative of the effect of such sustained intensity. It’s as exhausting, mentally and physically, as the exertions of daily life on the treadmill, a punishment as reward.

When they slow the pace a shade, the weight is turned up, and when they hit a groove, it’s explosive and blistering. The tripwire guitar that stretches its sinews over the sludgy trudge of ‘Lung’ only raises the tension, and closer ‘Avail’ draws a heavy curtain of screaming anguish on proceedings with distorted vocals tearing across a rumbling bassline and savage guitars.

There’s a desperation and urgency about Sterilize which ensures that it crackles from beginning to end. Everything seethes, spits and scrapes and there’s not a moment’s relief. It’s this intensity which makes Sterilize as strong as any Unsane release. It’s mercilessly harrowing, but is ultimately satisfying in a perverse, sadistic sense.

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