Posts Tagged ‘Bone Cult’

Christopher Nosnibor

The 13th of July is a Friday. It seems like an appropriate date for a show hosted by The Trembling Hellish Infernal Nightmare Generator. And besides, an event that involves standing in a dark pub venue being aurally assaulted by four noisy bands in sweltering heat represents the perfectly antithetical alternative to the populism of a city swarming with racegoers.

It might not exactly be packed for Pak40, who begin their set with a claxon and bass hum, before thumping in with some tom-heavy drumming and thunderous, super-low bass growl that comes on like early Earth, only with percussion. While the duo’s focus is firmly on the creation of maximum noise, the stylistic manifestations are varied, with classic rock elements churned through a cement mixer and a vocal style characterised by elongated vowels that range from pysch-tinged prog to something closer to Bong. The final track is sludgy as hell, but ups the pace considerably, inviting comparisons to Fudge Tunnel.

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Pak40

Saltwater Injection are another drum / bass combo. As last year’s debut single, ‘Vinegar / Cuntryfile Part 3’ revealed, they’re noisy, too, cranking out a mesh of grindcore noise interspersed and overlaid with trebly, distorted samples from films and whatnot. It’s not about innovation, but execution, and after a lengthy intro, the bass feedback howls and they go full-throttle to deliver a set of high-octane aggression. It’s stick-twirling drummer Paul Soames who provides the vocals – predominantly guttural barks to their frenetic attacks. There are flickers of pop, but they’re transmogrified into roaring slabs of rage that go off like a clusterbomb.

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Saltwater Injection

Nottingham’s Bone Cult have been on my radar for a while, and I’ve been quite taken with their brand of hard-edged technoindustrial crossover music. Visually, they’re on a whole other level: with dense smoke, neon skull-masks, a crisp, clinical sound, and laser lighting shooting every which way, they transform the 120-capacity pub venue with a stage a foot high into an academy-type gig experience. They’re so slick, so tight, so immense. For all the intensity and aggression, they do seem a shade lightweight in context, mining more the Pretty Hate Machine era sound of Nine Inch Nails and aping the electro end of the Wax Trax! roster circa 1988. Still, in terms of entertainment, they’re hard to fault.

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Bone Cult

The same is true of headliners, London three-piece Little Death Machine. They neither look nor sound like a band on the lower rungs of the circuit. They’re mechanoid tight, and have a set packed with killer tunes, delivered with nuance, passion, emotion, and panache. A spot of research suggests that this is a new lineup, and while I lack the reference to compare to the old one, they seem to have gelled well. Yes, they do sound a lot like Placebo. A LOT like Placebo. But old Placebo, which is A Good Thing. It’s a punchy set, packed out with songs with massive drive and killer hooks and crackling energy. It’s also the perfect climax to an exciting night.

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Little Death Machine

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Based in Nottingham, UK, Bone Cult are a ‘Death-Electronic’ duo. To mark the fifth anniversary of the band, Bone Cult are re-releasing a selection of their standout tracks that follow the evolution of their sound.

‘Healed’ originally appeared on their debut EP Liber Phasma in 2014, but has remained one of their most popular songs, despite never being released as a single. The track recently featured in the online game Avakin Life where digital models of the band performed the track inside a virtual venue.

Listen to ‘Healed’ here:

AA

Bone Cult

Nottingham two-piece death-electronica band Bone Cult are set to release their new single, ‘SALT’ on 3rd May, and Aural Aggravation is immensely proud to present a video exclusive of  said video.
Formed by Sam Hartill (bass, production) and Richard Watte (vocals, guitar, production) with a desire to offer a strong alternative to “the regular four guys in jeans and t-shirt look”, the band has since gained high-profile support slots with the likes of The Qemists, Slaves, Sleaford Mods and more.
‘The track SALT, which is an acronym for Such A Long Time, was a step away from our previous releases, showcasing a different side of Bone Cult’s production whilst still reflecting the same emotions explored in their last single ‘Fortune and Sorrow’.
“There are different layers of vocals to portray the same narrative, only from alternative perspectives,” says Sam Hartill.
Championing solid production and strong visuals, ‘SALT’ carries the visceral pulsing energy of 65daysofstatic via the slick, accessible dance vibes of Daft Punk.
Watch the video here (and remember where you saw it first!)
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Something a bit different for us here at AA, perhaps, but Bone Cult’s new single certainly meets our general rubric… The Nottingham two-piece death-electronica band are set to release their new single, ‘Fortune And Sorrow’ on December 12th.

Formed by Sam Hartill (bass, production) and Richard Watte (vocals, guitar, production) with a desire to offer a strong alternative to "the regular four guys in jeans and t-shirt look", the band has since gained high-profile support slots with the likes of The Qemists, Slaves, Sleaford Mods and more.

Championing solid production and strong visuals, on ‘Fortune And Sorrow’ the pair channels the rage of Death Grips, and the energy of The Prodigy via the slick, accessible dance vibes of Daft Punk.

Of the track’s inspirations, bassist Sam Hartill comments: "The track is a return to our original sound on the ‘Blackwork’ EP, and explores the emotions experienced through loss and recovery.
"That feeling of loss refers to the last 18 months where we felt we lost a lot of time and only now have found our momentum again."

Get your lugs round it here: https://soundcloud.com/bonecult/fortune-and-sorrow *

 

* We’re having a few technical issues with embedding SoundCloud right now: we’ll have an altogether prettier version of this up soon, hopefully.

 

Bone Cult