Posts Tagged ‘Long Division Festival’

Long Division ​have confirmed the first wave of guests for this year’s festival, now scheduled for the weekend of September 25th rather than it’s usual occurrence in early June. Having made the decision to move the Wakefield festival to give them the best chance of staging it in a safe manner, Long Division’s organisers are now optimistic about the festival going ahead following the UK government’s roadmap towards easing Covid-19 restrictions. Consisting mostly of artists who were originally scheduled to play the festival in 2020, this initial lineup will be added to over the coming months.

At the forefront of the announcement are Sunderland indie stalwarts ​The Futureheads​, renowned beatboxer and comedian​ Beardyman​, lo-fi psych-punk duo​ The Lovely Eggs​, the Manchester post-punk collective ​Brix & The Extricated​ (featuring the ex-Fall members Brix Smith Start and Steve Hanley), and ​Lanterns on the Lake​ who released their Mercury-nominated latest album on Bella Union last year. Joining them are The Wirral’s ​She Drew The Gun​, Scottish singer-songwriter and Idlewild frontman ​Roddy Woomble​, and London-duo ​Peggy Sue​, along with Beans on Toast​, ​Too Many T’s​, ​Big Joanie​, ​Hands Off Gretel​, ​Langkramer​, ​Katie Spencer​, ​Jodie Nicholson​ and ​Mt Misery​.

With the first Long Division event dating back to 2011, the award-winning festival celebrates their long-running status this year with their 10th edition. An occasion which has grown over the years to become one of the most anticipated cultural events in the Wakefield calendar, Long Division draws droves of music lovers to the area from much further afield.

Committed to a wider role in providing support and opportunities to the city, Long Division have also been planning a number of important initiatives that will run alongside the festival (and throughout the year), including the introduction of a free-to-hire City PA system for Wakefield arts events, and securing additional funding to form the Wakefield Live Music Consortium to support a wider scheme of live music curation in the city. Beyond this, Long Division are also working on bringing a dedicated rehearsal space to Wakefield city centre, alongside a new education programme that will work with up to 100 young people throughout the year, earning them qualifications whilst supporting them in forming new bands and organising events. With all of this combined, the hope is that these efforts will hugely benefit the music offering of Wakefield in a wide sense.

Dean Freeman, Founder / Director, Long Division:

“It’s such a strange mix of emotions to ‘be back’ with another lineup announcement. It honestly felt like the early days again, where it was exciting just to design a poster and see those names laid out, ready to share with the world. We want to give people the best possible Long Division we can. Not the biggest ever, but one that celebrates not just our ten years, and not just the return of live music but also the power of community. People being together – even if it’s with 1 metre gaps and masks and sanitising their hands every 30 minutes. Even if half the audience is watching via a stream. It’s going to be great!

This year audiences need to put their faith in their promoters, in their festivals, and they need to buy tickets. For Long Division refunds will always be available should the worst happen. And I know that finances may be stretched. But at Long Division that £30 for a ticket goes so far and enables so many artists to perform. Grassroots festivals like this (there are many more) are an essential part of kickstarting this insane machine called live music. We’d love you to join us in Wakefield this year!”

Tickets and more are available at the Long Division website.

210302 - LD - Poster A4 - Line-Up 2021-page-001

Long Division – 21st August 2020

Christopher Nosnibor

The second of the albums released as a fundraiser for Wakefield’s Long Division Festival presents another mix of established, up-and-coming, and new acts which encapsulates the festival’s egalitarian ethos. With its focus primarily on the local and regional, one may be forgiven for expecting a mixed bag both in terms of style and quality, but local is by no means a byword for low standards around these parts, and while this second collection – like its predecessor – is stylistically varied, the quality is remarkable.

It’s also arranged as an album of two halves, with the second being considerably more commercial, and what you’d probably call summery.

York’s Cowgirl – one of the countess projects from the city featuring the wide-ranging talents of Danny Barton (who’s also just released a new single under his Wolf Solent moniker) makes for a strong start, with its Pavementy slacker indie stylings. It’s got that up-front, full-tilt, everything-loud energy-bursting lo-fi production that delivers the buzz direct into the brain and makes you feel good instantly.

Priestgate’s ‘Now’ is a more 80s vintage style, while ‘Walking Backwards’ by Glasgow’s Life Model’s is a wonderfully poised shoegaze affair. The vocals sound lovelorn, but sign off with a strong and determined refrain of ‘I never liked you at all’ before a swell of rippling guitars surge in.

I’m waiting for a weak track, but Lemon Drink certain aren’t the one’s to serve it, with ‘Manic’ being a tight and lively slice of zesty grunge-tinged indie pop.

Mt Doubt might lack immediacy but bring mood, and HerTiltedMoons’ contribution, the brooding but lightly melodic piano-led folk-pop of ‘Orange Grove’ arrives as quite a surprise in its Coors-like commerciality, and taking a different but equally accessible tack, the quirky electronica of In The Morning Light’s ‘Milk and Honey’ is a groove-orientated tune. Bunkerpop bring a taste of the Caribbean.

It’s back to the 80s again with a dash of Ultravox and a splash of Spandau – and even a hint of B-Movie on Macroscope’s ‘Reveal’, and drawing the curtain on the collection, Little State of Georgia offer up the sparse and intimate ‘Little Tiny Ones’, a devastatingly cool work of brooding minimalist electronica that’s haunting and emotionally resonant, presenting a classic case of less being more, before swelling into a cinematic power-ballad finale.

Once again, there’s something for everyone here, and more significantly, New Addition Vol 2 showcases a wealth of talent that is entirely dependent on grass-roots venues gigs, independent festivals, and indie labels who are willing to take a punt. Because acts who break through are rarely the best ones, but the ones with backing – but getting that backing requires that initial exposure and support. Without that, it all falls apart.

AA

a4204335405_10

As part of their fundraising efforts, Wakefield’s Long Division Festival – which has now been postponed until 2021 – have announced two new records available to order as part of this Friday’s Bandcamp fee-free day.

The first is  ‘A Romantic Destination’ – a live album by Jamie Lockhart, leader of critically acclaimed DIY Wakefield band Mi Mye. Recorded at Long Division 2018, ‘A Romantic Destination’’ see’s the songwriter and producer reimagining music from a book of songs that has been passed down by his family in Skerray in the Highlands for 166 years.

A songbook from 1851 used by two brothers; one a folk songwriter, the other the 1st Piper To Queen Victoria was passed down six generations before ending up in Jamie’s hands – accompanied by Mi Mye bandmate Morgan Evans, ‘A Romantic Destination’ captures this incredibly special one-off and sold out performance.

The second of these new albums is ‘New Additions: Vol 2’ – the second in a run of compilations from Long Division Festival, ‘New Additions’ features brand new songs and recordings from artists who had been scheduled to play at this year’s Long Division Festival.

Pressed onto 12” vinyl thanks to support from independent label ‘Last Night From Glasgow’ , New Additions features 10 new songs from a host of exciting new artists including Priestgate, Cowgirl and Mt. Doubt with all proceeds distributed evenly amongst the artists.

Full Track listing:

· Cowgirl – Wasn’t Listening

· Priestgate – Now

· Life Model – Walking Backwards

· Lemon Drink – Manic

· Mt. Doubt – Stairwell Songs

· HerTiltedMoons – Orange Grove

· In The Morning Lights – Milk And Honey

· Bunkerpop – C’est Comme De Robots N’est Pas

· Macroscope – Reveal

· The State Of Georgia – Little Tiny Ones

Both records are available to buy now from Bandcamp: https://longdivisionfestival.bandcamp.com

Long Division’s Crowdfunder is sitting just below 50% of its goal after its first week, more information on the fund, how it will be spent and how you can contribute can be found here.

Christopher Nosnibor

It makes sense for a band renowned for their killer live shows to release a live album, but it takes a band with a certain amount of guts to make that album a project that’s part of a festival’s proceedings, and to go for the live album by way of their third full-length. Post War Glamour Girls have got guts, alright, and Live at St Austin’s was recorded as the ‘watch a band record a live album’ Sunday night session at the end of this year’s Long Division festival in Wakefield.

They open with a very curious hybrid of ‘Sestra’ and ‘Brat’, which respectively stood as bookends to their debut, Pink Fur. In parts completely unrecognisable in relation to either of the originals, it’s a more sedate and altogether less fiery reworking. James Smith shows remarkable restraint, his rowdy raving replaced by a crooning style, which sits alongside some soulful harmonies, the likes of which haven’t been heard from the band previously. Structurally, it’s also completely different… and comes to an abrupt and ungainly halt that sounds like the tape being chewed. Well, it is live, after all. Anything can happen and you only get one take.

‘That’s probably it for music,’ James quips. ‘I’ll now be doing my stand-up set’. Granted, there’s a lot more music and no stand-up, but you wouldn’t put anything past this band. So premiering a new track from their upcoming third album by way of a second track is pretty much par for the course. There’s something of an early- to mid-eighties guitar pop feel to ‘Polyanna Cowgirl’ (commercial pop was seemingly a fair few shades darker then), and it boasts a bold and hooky chorus.

If making their first album a greatest hits / best of set seems like the obvious a to go, you know that’s precisely what you’re not going to get, and second album Feeling Strange (released less than six months before this performance) is largely shunted to one side in favour of their debut, new material, and a handful of covers – which, naturally, are off the beaten track and are drawn in from far out on the left-field (and their version of Elvis Costello’s ‘Shipbuilding’ is as moving as it is unexpected… not that it should be expected for a band who’ve previously covered Robert Palmer).

The vinyl, which presents an abridged version of the occasion to present a different aspect of the set-list (in an alternative sequence) omits the spiky, goth-tinged rendition of ‘Stolen Flowers Rust’ and two of the tracks culled from their second album, presumably on account of space. ‘Cannonball Villages’ (not on the vinyl) is one of the standouts of Feeling Strange and builds an immense, dark, brooding twisting epic journey. As Smith growls the refrain ‘I knew the moment I laid my eyes on you / that I would do anything to get my hands on you,’ it sounds as much like a threat as an expression of desire. Closer ‘Count Your Blessings’ – a bleak choice of a set-ender, if the truth be told – is also omitted from the vinyl, and the fact that such a great rendition can be relegated to the download is testament to the depth of their material – and of course, their unswerving perversity in selecting unreleased tracks and covers over others. Single cuts like ‘Jazz Funerals’, ‘Southpaw Stance’ and ‘Felonius Punk’ don’t get a look in

The slowed-down version of ‘Black Dolphin’ and the dreamy version of ‘Gustave’, on which Alice takes lead vocal duties, offer very different perspectives on established songs, and the piano motif which runs through the Curesque take on ‘Red Terror’, with its crazy reverb action, again places the familiar in an unfamiliar context. The addition of organ and keys to a number of tracks also adds a new dimension to the sound.

Live at St Austin’s works precisely because of its imperfections and its – superficially, at least – perverse set-list. As a live album, it captures the immediacy of a band who thrive on live performances, and at the same time, are all about taking risks and showcasing new material. Go to a PWGG gig and you’ll see a band testing themselves and the audience with new material. This makes the inclusion of debut single ‘Spitting Pearls’ all the more surprising and welcome. They’ve probably played it about twice since its release: it’s a personal favourite, and they more than do it justice here, Smith finally unleashing his full-throated Tom Waits holler. It’s fucking brilliant, and met, briefly, with a stunned silence.

Live at St Austin’s is an honest live album: it’s not that the sound is rough, because it isn’t: but in places, the instruments aren’t perfectly balanced and there are some dud notes and off-key harmonies. And that’s precisely why it’s so good: it sounds like you could actually be there, it’s not dressed up and overdubbed and polished to studio quality. It’s very much a document of the band that Post War Glamour Girls are, a snapshot of a band who are continually evolving, forever restless, always trying out new arrangements and new material. And yes, they’re the kind of band who place art over commerce, who really are bursting with creativity and are making music for the right reasons. And they truly are one of a kind.

 

Post War Glamour Girls - Live At St Austin's Cover